The crazy insides of my interests

juliajm15:

Some sisters’ bonding moments :)
Jul 23

juliajm15:

Some sisters’ bonding moments :)

(via fuckyeahdisneyfanart)

Jul 23

disneylicious-art:

(x)

Burton Style

(via megabyte3)

yerawizardbarry:

when you need to cough in an exam but you’ve already coughed like twice so you just sit there suffocating

(via undercover-witch)

Jul 23
Jul 23

horroroftruant:

The Art of Mike Bell

Artist Mike Bell was born and raised at the Jersey Shore and currently lives in Northfield, New Jersey. Best known for his figurative paintings, Bell is an artist whose work is a juxtaposition of iconic pop culture subjects combined with modern day influences. He also creates painted objects, such as bowling pins and surfboards, as well as delightful palm-sized matchbook art depicting pop culture icons such as Mr. Peanut, Marilyn Monroe, Jimmy Hendrix, Frankenstein and Humphrey Bogart. Most of his work falls into the lowbrow genre. Lowbrow art is an underground visual art movement that originated in Los Angeles in the late 70s, a populist art movement with cultural roots related to underground comics, punk music, hot-rods and surf culture. The artwork usually displays a sense of humor. 

Bell attended The College of New Jersey where he received his degree in Advertising Design and minored in Illustration. He has exhibited his artwork in a number of galleries throughout the United States and internationally. Though his hometown of Atlantic City has eluded him for many years, Bell was recently invited to participate in an art project in Atlantic City where he created the first of 90 Art Boxes for the Atlantic City Arts Commission’s new Art Box Project. 

Mike Bell recently created a t-shirt line, and was featured in the newly published book Edgy Cute by Mark Batty Publishing, New York. He has been the Director of Design and Production at Masterminds for four years. Bell continues making art, always learning and improving his skills by taking chances and challenging himself to step outside of his comfort zone.

Website

kambriel:

Intriguing for those who enjoy (& sometimes copy) the iconic “Bride of Frankestein” look ~ Elsa’s wig was actually on an auburn hair base, not black.
With black & white films, people often forget all of the colours that were actually in use on set, since pure black & white read so harshly on film.  I remember carefully studying the Dracula Bride outfits from the 1931 film way back when I was creating my first Dracula’s Bride Gown, and realized that the originals were quite likely made in pastels to give that pale, but subtle depth.
I rather adore that the original wig is red w/streaks ~ make it a little more burgundy, and it would have been the way I dyed my own hair with silver streaks back in 12th grade.
Jul 22

kambriel:

Intriguing for those who enjoy (& sometimes copy) the iconic “Bride of Frankestein” look ~ Elsa’s wig was actually on an auburn hair base, not black.

With black & white films, people often forget all of the colours that were actually in use on set, since pure black & white read so harshly on film.  I remember carefully studying the Dracula Bride outfits from the 1931 film way back when I was creating my first Dracula’s Bride Gown, and realized that the originals were quite likely made in pastels to give that pale, but subtle depth.

I rather adore that the original wig is red w/streaks ~ make it a little more burgundy, and it would have been the way I dyed my own hair with silver streaks back in 12th grade.

plasmatics-life:

Waterfall | (by Hélène Desplechin)
Jul 22

plasmatics-life:

Waterfall | (by Hélène Desplechin)

Jul 21

(Source: mortisia)


Yvonne De Carlo, 1952
Jul 21

Yvonne De Carlo, 1952

(Source: sharontates, via sharontates)

dayswithdisney:

Oswald and Ortensia kiss
"Oh, What a Knight!" (1928), Oswald the Lucky Rabbit
Jul 20

dayswithdisney:

Oswald and Ortensia kiss

"Oh, What a Knight!" (1928), Oswald the Lucky Rabbit

Jul 17

(Source: fuckyeahdisneyfanart)